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Lake Eyasi is a seasonal shallow endorheic salt lake on the floor of the Great Rift Valley at the base of the Serengeti Plateau, just south of the Serengeti National Park and immediately southwest of the Ngorongoro Crater in the Crater Highlands of Tanzania.

Uniquely beautiful Lake Eyasi lies at 1030m between the Eyasi escarpment in the north and the Kidero Mountains in the south. Like Lake Natron far to the northeast, Eyasi makes a rewarding detour on a Ngorongoro trip for anyone looking for something remote and different.

The lake itself varies considerably in size depending on the rains and supports a mix of waterbirds including huge breeding-season (June to November) populations of flamingos and pelicans. In the dry season, it’s little more than a parched lake bed, adding to the rather other-worldly, primeval ambiance of the area.

 

Interact with the Bushmen, the Hadzabe Tribe, who live in groups hunting with bow and arrows and gathering roots, tubers, and wild fruits much as humankind lived in the Stone Age for your best Northern Tanzania Safari.

You can get an in-depth look at how they continue to survive and how they adapt to their harsh environment and the challenges they face to continue this nomadic existence.

The Datoga tribe are blacksmiths, a trade developed over centuries and still practiced in varying much the same way today. They produce the arrowheads for the Hadzabe and brass trinkets, some of which will be for sale by the maker himself.

 

Lake Eyasi is a seasonal shallow endorheic salt lake on the floor of the Great Rift Valley at the base of the Serengeti Plateau, just south of the Serengeti National Park and immediately southwest of the Ngorongoro Crater in the Crater Highlands of Tanzania.
The lake is elongated, orientated southwest to northeast, and lies in the Eyasi-Wembere branch of the Great Rift Valley.

During the dry season the lake may dry up almost entirely, especially in drier years, so that Datooga herders and Hadza foragers will cross the lake on foot, but in El Niño years it may flood its banks and attract hippopotamus from the Serengeti